Plant Swap

Go Back   Plant Swap > Garden Talk > Edibles



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-05-2009, 04:32 PM
Acorn
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
Posts: 1
iTrader: (0)

Coolrooting herbs? (peppermint in particular)


I have a full, abundant mint plant (herb) on my patio in a pot. Anyone have any experience rooting this MINT so that I can give away a lot of little MINT baby plants to friends.
Definitely aroma therapy and great in green/or any other tea.
Also, any help or great experience with growing other herbs open sun on the patio in clay pots? I have chives, curly parsley, basil, peppermint - what others are wonderful? I'm thinking about rosemary, dill, thyme, selantro (sp?). (P.S. I live in sunny South Florida)

Thanks for any advice from Dorothylovesflowers (I also love herbs - all kinds).
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-05-2009, 08:03 PM
aravenschild's Avatar
Flowering Shrub
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Missouri Zone 6-b
Posts: 758
iTrader: (18)
Cut off about an 8 in piece and stick it in water till it roots, mints aren't fussy about it

As for other herbs, I not sure, but maybe someone else will stop by with suggestions
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-06-2009, 02:18 AM
katsrevenge's Avatar
Blossom
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 225
iTrader: (4)
Rosemary, thyme and dill are easy as pie. Just don't let them get 100% dry. I pluck bits all the time, and will be bringing most in come fall. Lavender is also easy (and tasty). If you can find chocolate mint... OMG, YUM.

Celantro (I think?) is pickier... mine keeps getting a bit yellow. I snip all flowers off to keep them bushy.

I grow in plastic pots.. I'd prefer clay with this weather though. To probagate, I just divide a bit off the plant.
__________________

Flowers are the beautiful hieroglyphics of nature with which she indicates how much she loves us. ~ Goethe
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-06-2009, 07:04 AM
gone_tropical's Avatar
Vegetable Garden
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Orlando FL, Zone 9b
Posts: 5,814
iTrader: (93)
Hi Dorothy and welcome from Orlando

mints, I love mints as well, have several different ones... they do well for us for sure.
as mentioned before, you can root mint sprigs in a glass of water, but I skip this step and lay mint sprigs onto potting mix, covering it a bit with soil and keep moist.

Herbs love sun but the FL midday sun is even too much for herbs. Give them some sun protection.
Then there are some annual herbs that do well during the winter season, like rue, cilantro, lovage, nasturtium, but will wilt away as soon as the heat and humidity starts up.

instead of the northern type chives grow garlic chives (not society garlic!). Garlic chives look like grass and bloom white and take the heat just great.
instead of the 'real' French tarragon, grow Mexican tarragon
And do try Thai basil, it lasts way longer in our heat compared to the sweet basil.

happy growing
__________________

Gone Tropical's Garden
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-27-2009, 05:19 PM
tiger2462's Avatar
Flower
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: malta Zone 5-6
Posts: 430
iTrader: (22)
Mints are easy as stated. I like plastic verses clay for the reason clay pots soak up alot of the water needed for the plants and can get very hot on some of the roots. I have all kinds of herbs and would have to say all are easy enough. Not to finicky. Nastrium seems to be the most for me but not others. When you grow herbs always pinch and pick. It helps promote more leaves and gets bushier instead of growing straight up. Saving seed is easy also. I advise keeping flower heads off of herbs until the last moment before getting cold or frost. Most herbs will die back after going to seed. Or just let a few stalks go to seed but not the whole plant. Choc. mint is to die for and then orange mint is heavenly. I also love basil's. I have lime, ti, cinnamon, big leaf & spicy. Check with me in the fall because i hope to have lots of seed.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-27-2009, 10:10 PM
Sweets2005's Avatar
Blossom
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Delaware
Posts: 182
iTrader: (2)
Originally Posted by gone_tropical View Post:
as mentioned before, you can root mint sprigs in a glass of water, but I skip this step and lay mint sprigs onto potting mix, covering it a bit with soil and keep moist.

I don't get this method... You lay the cutting down onto some soil and cover the whole cutting with a bit of soil? Does mint do well in mostly shade?

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-28-2009, 06:21 AM
katsrevenge's Avatar
Blossom
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 225
iTrader: (4)
Or you can just stick them into the dirt. They generally root right up.
__________________

Flowers are the beautiful hieroglyphics of nature with which she indicates how much she loves us. ~ Goethe
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-28-2009, 09:44 AM
Sweets2005's Avatar
Blossom
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Delaware
Posts: 182
iTrader: (2)
Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-28-2009, 11:23 AM
SouthernCharm1's Avatar
Flowering Shrub
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Z9, Orlando Florida
Posts: 536
iTrader: (12)

Lightbulb


Here is a method I find woks excellent for rooting most anything and very cost efficient. Easy Propagation chamber w/pics

Have any questions about this method just ask.

__________________
~Kathy~

*The wind of Heaven is that which blows between the ears of a horse*
~Arabian Proverb
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-28-2009, 11:37 AM
SouthernCharm1's Avatar
Flowering Shrub
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Z9, Orlando Florida
Posts: 536
iTrader: (12)

Smile


Forgot to add... I found that with growing herbs some are not as hardy as others in direct sunlight, for instance I grow both herbs from seed and herb plants that I purchased ready to use. I grow the herbs from seed in direct sunlight and they tolerate it just fine, but the plants I purchase always need partial shade for some reason and never will adjust to full sun. I also only use plastic pots for those in the sun.

I start my herb seeds in the fall/winter our weather generally permits this here. Anywho, hope you find a propagation method that works great for you.
__________________
~Kathy~

*The wind of Heaven is that which blows between the ears of a horse*
~Arabian Proverb
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-30-2009, 11:20 PM
SeeksRoots's Avatar
Flower
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zone 5A - Northern Illinois
Posts: 395
iTrader: (4)
Originally Posted by Dorothylovesflowers View Post:
I have a full, abundant mint plant (herb) on my patio in a pot. Anyone have any experience rooting this MINT so that I can give away a lot of little MINT baby plants to friends.
Definitely aroma therapy and great in green/or any other tea.
Also, any help or great experience with growing other herbs open sun on the patio in clay pots? I have chives, curly parsley, basil, peppermint - what others are wonderful? I'm thinking about rosemary, dill, thyme, selantro (sp?). (P.S. I live in sunny South Florida)

Thanks for any advice from Dorothylovesflowers (I also love herbs - all kinds).
Hey Dorothylovesflowers..

I was wondering how your mint rooted. I have always done mint by divisions but would like to do cuttings to control the length on some like apple mint which is 2 or 3 feet tall. I am new here, and wondered if anyone else is growing herbs.

SeeksRoots
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-30-2009, 11:33 PM
tianamelis's Avatar
Sprout
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zone 9, Sunset western Zone 20, North Hollywood California
Posts: 57
iTrader: (12)
I have herbs up the wazoo (not sure if I spelled "wazoo" right, Lol! )

Apple mint is aggressive and will root easily... Like GT said, just stick it in the soil and keep it moist and it will root. You can chop the 2-3 foot lengths of mint into 6" pieces and stick each one in the soil and you will have tons of little mints in no time.

What herbs do you have?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-31-2009, 07:54 PM
SeeksRoots's Avatar
Flower
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zone 5A - Northern Illinois
Posts: 395
iTrader: (4)
tianamelis:

LOL...that must be pretty uncomfortable!!

I have a little bit of everything I guess, or so my hubby says. I have sweet, lime and purple basils. Chives and garlic chives. My cilantro and perennial cilantro have both already gone to seed as has my dill. I have lemon verbena, lemongrass and sweet marjoram. I am always looking for new mints, but I have apple, cat, chocolate, lemon, orange, peppermint, pineapple and spearmint. I have oregano and golden oregano, curly and flat italian parsley. I have a new rosemary plant that I will have to bring in this winter, sage, pineapple sage and tricolor sage as well as some creeping thyme. Also new this year is leomn thyme and french tarragon.

SeeksRoots
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-07-2009, 09:51 PM
Corin's Avatar
Blade of Grass
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Smoky Mtns, NC 7
Posts: 137
iTrader: (4)
Hey SeeksRoots,
I have a new rosemary plant, too. Maybe 6" high so far. Last time I brought one inside --and it was a big healthy one --I went nutstrying to keep it from drying out but it died anyway. How do you overwinter yours?
__________________
Earth laughs in flowers.
william wads1234567--Emerson
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-08-2009, 01:11 PM
SeeksRoots's Avatar
Flower
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Zone 5A - Northern Illinois
Posts: 395
iTrader: (4)

Rosemary suggestions


Corin:

Well, it's not easy or I wouldn't have to be growing a new one this year..LOL! Seriously, being in Northern Illinois we have cold winters so of course I have to bring it inside. The tricky part is getting it enough sun without the humidity. I have only a limited amount of places where I have enough sun for plants brought inside and most of them already have some houseplants. The majority of plants brought inside need to be in plastic pots and need misting or humidity trays under or near them because of the dry air from the furnace. This is not a problem, except when it comes to your Rosemary...I keep it in a clay pot, and it does not like the humidity levels of most house plants. It likes to be on the drier side both in soil and in air, but finding a place it likes can be tricky. It also seems to like air movement, like an overhead fan, but not a blast from the furnace vents. That is how I killed mine I think, I didn't have a terra cotta pot that big and left it in the plastic planter and brought it inside, had to put it back of others and there was too much humidity and not enough air circulation and it got powdery mildew.

Here is another suggestion, take cuttings when you bring it in. Root them in a pot covered with a plastic bag or a clear plastic cover, vent everyday or they will mold. Keep where bright but not in direct sun or they will just cook. When they grow a bit of root move (tug on them, if you get resistence, they are rooting) then move them into the sun and uncover them! They require the same dryish soil and air, but seem a bit more tolerant than older plants. Then, if you should lose the mother plant at least you have still got the seedlings to put out in the spring or share with friends!!

Does this sound reasonable to you?
SeeksRoots
Reply With Quote
Reply
-->

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin - Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2005-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved.