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  #31  
Old 07-11-2009, 09:02 PM
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SmileRooting Eucalyptus


Can eucalyptus be rooted this way ,,,I saw some in the Wal-Mart here in the flowers that can be bought in bouquets,,,I have been wanting some eucalyptus plants,,I think that is the name of them,,,but cant find anyone that has them for cuttings,,so if I did buy some of them in the store can they be rooted,,,thank you for your time and kindness, take care God bless you and your loved ones,,Cassie
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  #32  
Old 07-12-2009, 12:44 AM
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Originally Posted by cassiegerald View Post:
I think I am doing something wrong, I keep my pot in a clear pot saucer and I have to keep dipping out water out of it when i keep the smaller pot filled,,if I dont it will eventually go all over my counter top,,so what am I doing wrong or is it suppossed to do that,,my pot is 8 inches and the clay pot is 3 1/2 inches,,,I checked the duct tape and it is still sealed but within the day or the next day it is well down to 1/3 water in the clay pot,,leave it to me to do something wrong with something so simple as this pot...lol..I welcome any suggestions if I am doing something wrong,,,also I forgot to mention,,I soaked the vermiculite down real good til water was running out the bottom before I put it in the clear saucer and inserting the clay pot in the middle,,could that have anything to do with it,,,what do I need to do...thank you for your time and kindness,,take care God bless you and your loved ones,,Cassie
Hi Cassie,
I'm sorry that you're having troubles working the bugs out of your Forsythe pot.
It certainly sounds like too much water is moving through the terracotta pot too quickly. Mine do not empty themselves nearly that fast.

Soaking the vermiculite at the beginning as you did, is just what I do, too,
so I don't think that should be the problem at all.

If you think the water may be leaking around the duct tape,
then perhaps you could try plugging the bottom of the terracotta pot some other way.
A friend of mine used hot glue ... she put a piece of duct tape over the bottom of the pot when it was perfectly dry, and then squeezed enough melted hot glue inside the pot to completely cover the bottom.
I've never tried it, but it seems to work for her.

When I first found the instructions for this method,
they were quite specific about using the measurements that I repeated in my original post ...
that is to say, a 6 inch plastic pot and a 1 to 2 inch terracotta pot.
The plastic pots which I use have saucers that actually attach right to the bottom, so those are a very close fit,
and the small terracotta pots I found are about 2 inches.
I've never tried to use any other size of pots, so I don't know if that could be causing your troubles.
If nothing else works, I guess I'd suggest trying to find the smaller sizes if you wanted to.
Originally Posted by cassiegerald View Post:
Can eucalyptus be rooted this way ,,,I saw some in the Wal-Mart here in the flowers that can be bought in bouquets,,,I have been wanting some eucalyptus plants,,I think that is the name of them,,,but cant find anyone that has them for cuttings,,so if I did buy some of them in the store can they be rooted,,,thank you for your time and kindness, take care God bless you and your loved ones,,Cassie
Well, there's certainly no harm in trying ... nothing ventured - nothing gained, right?
But from my experience (back when I worked at a wholesale nursery in Florida),
Eucalyptus is one of the MOST challenging plants to root from cuttings.
Even under our nearly perfect greenhouse conditions, with the sterile conditions and the hourly mistings,
our failure rate for Eucalyptus was higher than for any of the other plants I can recall.
It's also worth noting that some flowers and greenery in bouquets have been treated with preservatives that might inhibit the rooting process. It would be better to try with very fresh cuttings, if you could find them.
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Last edited by zuzu's petals; 07-12-2009 at 12:49 AM..
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  #33  
Old 07-12-2009, 06:39 AM
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Thank you Hon,,,I will try what you suggested,,and I appreciate you responding to the posts,,it helped me a lot and I think I will redo my pot and start all over again,,,I only have one cutting in it trying to get it to root,,it was out of a bouquet of flowers that my step son got me for mothers day,,and I have had it in water all this time til about 2 weeks ago and put it in the forsythe pot,,,the leaves have died on it but it still looks like it is thriving,,it hasnt died yet,,,so I will just put the cutting back in some water til I get the pot right...thank you for your kindness and info,,you take care God bless you and your loved ones,,,Cassie
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  #34  
Old 07-13-2009, 12:56 AM
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Quick question


can sand be used as an alternate for vermiculite?
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  #35  
Old 07-13-2009, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by danato View Post:
can sand be used as an alternate for vermiculite?
No harm in trying, I suppose ... after all, experimentation leads to learning.

However, sand - or any other substitution (such as perlite, which someone mentioned earlier in the thread),
is not likely to have quite the same absorbancy and dispersion properties as the vermiculite,
so the moisture levels of the medium may be lower, higher or just not evenly distributed throughout.

The same sort of troubles can arise from changing the sizes of the pots you use,
that can also affect the ratios of vermiculite to water and the effectiveness of the wicking process.

I have stuck with the original "recipe" because it works nearly perfectly for me.
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  #36  
Old 07-13-2009, 12:21 PM
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Thank you. I think I have got all the "ingredients" except for the vermiculite. i'll try and find some at lowes today.
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  #37  
Old 07-14-2009, 11:22 AM
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NEW TO THIS!! So I got questions...

When you do this do you cover with a bag? Do you set it in the sun?? I really wanna try but I wanna make sure I do it right..
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  #38  
Old 07-14-2009, 11:59 AM
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Hi Heather,
First about the sun - no I never put these where they are in direct sun,
always in what I would call a bright location, but not in the sun.

Also, I do not cover them with plastic bags.
I find that tending them daily and misting them with unchlorinated water (we have a well) provides all of the moisture necessary.
I keep these pots either outside (or sometimes in my glasshouse) during the summer months,
and in my very warm climate, I'm afraid they would cook inside a bag.
I think most of the plants I propagate prefer good air flow ... but I recognize that some plants may have different needs.


PS - The only reason I put them in the glasshouse is to keep bug and critter damage to a minimum.
During the summer, the conditions inside my glasshouse are the same as outside, in terms of temperature and humidity.

The reason that I like this system so much is not because I necessarily think it makes plants root faster than just using water,
but I feel that the roots which do form are "stronger" (so to speak),
as they have pushed out against the resistance of the vermiculite from when they first start to form, much as they would have to do in soil.
Otherwise, this method is not so much different from rooting in a jar of water.
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Last edited by zuzu's petals; 07-14-2009 at 12:01 PM..
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  #39  
Old 07-14-2009, 12:40 PM
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Thanks Zuzu,
You've been very helpful...
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  #40  
Old 07-15-2009, 08:28 PM
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Zuzu,

I tried this with azalea and the startings all died. Do you use the rooting compound? If so, what kind? I don't know what the problem was. Could it be that I had too much of the stem exposed? Are azaleas too hard to do? I really want this to work...so please help. Thanks!
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  #41  
Old 07-15-2009, 08:41 PM
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I've been trying several different plants in Forsythe Pots with varying results. The sedum and shrimp plants rooted very well, but I tried forsythia (which I thought would root anywhere), chrysanthemums, hydrangea, coleus, and others with no success.

In an almost perfect situation for azaleas and with a very healthy plant,I layered several limbs until I got tiny, hairlike roots on several. On some of them the roots just dried up. I moved some to water thinking I'd just keep them alive until I figured something better to do. Well, they perked right up and have continued to live there. Their roots are very slow at getting any better, but they have put out new leaves and I take that as a very good sign. I don't know yet when I will move them to soil, but probably soon.

My chrysanthemums did well in water and are now planted. I tried again on hydrangea, incubating the cuttings for a couple of weeks under a plastic jug and in the shade. I then moved them and put them directly into the pots where my hydrangea plants are in stage 3 (sounds bad, but it's good). They are all about ready to go into the ground to get situated for winter.

Anyway, for me no one way seems to work. I do have my Forsyth pots full right now, one with several cuttings of bacopa, which is supposed to be easy to root. So I haven't given up, but I'm not thrilled yet.
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Old 07-15-2009, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by snowmm View Post:
Zuzu,

I tried this with azalea and the startings all died. Do you use the rooting compound? If so, what kind? I don't know what the problem was. Could it be that I had too much of the stem exposed? Are azaleas too hard to do? I really want this to work...so please help. Thanks!
Hi snow,
to answer the first of your questions, yes, I do use a rooting hormone.
If you go back to my original post, there's actually a photo of the little jar,
so that you can see which one I've been using, I got it at Lowe's.

Now, as BarefootGardener has said, different methods work better for some plants than for others.
And, even as much as I love this technique, I do still use other methods of vegetative propagation, as well.
If I want to root plants that I know will do just fine for me in water, then I don't bother setting up a F'Pot for them.
And if it is my experience that a certain plant is a snap to root directly in potting soil,
then straight into a pot of dirt it goes - I don't even bother with rooting it in water first.
But, there were some plants that always seemed to give me fits, I'd lose 50% or more of them when I tried dirt or water.
That was the only reason I even tried this when I first found out about it.
And, speaking only for myself, the F'Pots worked like magic from the first time I tried them.
Now, does that mean that everyone will have the same experience? Certainly not.
And does it mean that I succeed with every cutting I try ... also, no.
But I do have a significantly higher success rate than I used to ... and that's enough to make me a happy camper.
The way I view the Forsythe method is like this,
it is sort of halfway between rooting in water and rooting in soil.

Don't know why it's not cooperating with you BFG ... ...
I've had success with Hydrangea, Coleus, tropical Hibiscus, and even mums, but I've never tried Forsythia.

Back to your Azaleas, snow.
I've also never tried rooting an Azalea this way, so I can't give you firsthand experience.
If I had access to the shrub, I'd probably opt for a layering technique with Azeleas.
That is my preferred method with them, as well as Forsythias and many other woody shrubs.
To do that, I just make a few light scrapes on the underside of a low hanging limb
and then (without cutting it from the mama plant) I dust the scrapes with rooting hormone.
Next, I bury the scraped and dusted part of the limb shallowly and weight it down with a rock or a brick ...
just enough weight to keep it from springing back up out of the shallow trench.
Normally, I would set it up and then leave it alone for several months
before testing to see if it has rooted solidly into the ground,
and if it has, then I cut it free from mama and dig it up for transplanting.

But, of course, if all you have is cuttings, then that option is out.
In that case, I'd probably divide my cuttings 3 ways,
I'd put 1/3 of them in an F'Pot, 1/3 directly into soil, and the rest into water -
I'd use rooting hormone on the ones in the F'Pot and the soil,
and I'd put a cutting or two of Willow into the water with the Azalea cuttings.
Finally, I'd cross all of my fingers and toes,and say a little prayer.
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Last edited by zuzu's petals; 07-15-2009 at 09:59 PM.. Reason: fixed a typo
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  #43  
Old 07-15-2009, 10:01 PM
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Thank you so much. I did these in enough time for experiments to fail...
If they worked great - if not - so be it. Besides it kept my mind off my ailments for a few days.

The Azaleas...I'll take the soil to the branch since I can't get the branch to the ground.

I don't have a willow tree around here but I do remember from last year that willow twigs helped me out. We try not to grow them in this area because we are all on well and septic.

What's the best way to propogate boxwood? Any ideas? I have lost of new growth on a huge bush.
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  #44  
Old 07-15-2009, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by snowmm View Post:
What's the best way to propogate boxwood? Any ideas? I have lost of new growth on a huge bush.
I've never propagated Boxwood, but here's a link that might help:
http://www.boxwoodsociety.org/boxwood_propagation.htm
It's propagation instructions from The American Boxwood Society,
they definitely oughta know, huh?
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  #45  
Old 07-26-2009, 07:53 PM
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great


thanks great info ,ill try it
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