Plant Swap

Go Back   Plant Swap > Garden Talk > General Gardening Talk



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-06-2008, 06:44 PM
zuzu's petals's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Coastal N. Carolina ~ Zone 8-ish
Posts: 7,109
iTrader: (44)

Propagating cuttings using Forsythe Pots ~


I do a lot of cutting propagation, whether they are cuttings that my online friends share with me,
or tender plants, like Coleus, that I want to hold over the winter months
for planting back into my garden next season.

There are many methods for rooting cuttings, and I've tried most of 'em,
some worked pretty well - some ... ... not so much.

Then I learned about Forsythe Pots a few years ago, and my success rate jumped dramatically,
this is the method that I use most often now.

This is a photo tutorial that I made a while back,
I hope that some of you may find it helpful.

To make the Forsythe Pots -

I use a clean 6 inch plastic pot with a well-fitted saucer
and a very small (2 inch) terracotta pot (must be terracotta) - bottom drain hole sealed
(I use 2 small squares of duct tape - one inside, and one on the bottom of the pot).

You'll also need vermiculite and something to keep the vermiculite from running
out through the drain holes.



(I used a square of weed-block here,
but a single layer of newspaper or paper towel works, too).



Fill the 6 inch pot with vermiculite,
to within about 3/4 in from the top
then add enough water to the pot so that it thoroughly moistens
the vermiculite and fills the saucer - do this ever so gently -
the water will wash the vermiculite right out of the pot
if you aren't careful.

Then press the tiny terracotta pot down into the center
of the larger pot, leaving at least a inch of the lip
above the level of the vermiculite.

Fill the terracotta pot with water,
this will act as a reservoir (the water will seep out through
the porous terracotta) making the unit self-watering,
just keep the saucer and the little terracotta pot topped off with water.



Next -

I use rooting hormone and a little dibble (poking stick).



If the cutting is semi-hardwood,
I GENTLY scrape a couple of small spots along
the bottom inch or so of the cutting, using the edge of my clippers
- - scrape very, very lightly - -
you just want to expose the bright green layer - no deeper
(*** if the cutting is soft-stemmed, like Coleus,
there is no need to scrape).



I coat the bottom few inches with the rooting hormone,
tapping off any excess.



Using the dibble, I make a hole in the moist vermiculite
so that I can insert the cutting without rubbing off the hormone powder.



I put the cutting into the hole,
then firm the damp vermiculite around it.



You can put lots of cuttings into one of these pots.




Finally, and very importantly, be sure to add a label
and put the pot somewhere that is bright,
but where it will get NO direct sun.




I will GENTLY tug at the cuttings in about 2 weeks
to see if they seem to be setting roots
- some plants root quickly, others may take considerably longer.

Remove and discard any cuttings that are clearly unhealthy.

If they have a "light grip" on the vermiculite,
I let them stay until they have a good, firm grip.

When they seem firmly rooted, remove the little terracotta pot
and gently remove your newly rooted plants,
separating them from each other gently.

Plant them into a good potting medium,
there is no need to remove any vermiculite that clings to the roots.



I use this method for rooting all sorts of plants,
it works really well for me.

Replace the old vermiculite between uses -
keeping the Forsythe Pot a fresh and sterile environment will minimize rot and disease
which can cause your cuttings to fail.
__________________
~*~ Zuzu ~*~



Last edited by zuzu's petals; 07-27-2017 at 02:23 PM.. Reason: p'bucket holding photos hostage :-(
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-06-2008, 06:59 PM
gardeningmom's Avatar
Tree
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hatboro, Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,722
iTrader: (8)
Terrific information. I've never propogated anything but this is so clear and concise I might be able to - Just thinking of all the cuttings I could do.
__________________
'Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind
of battle.'True
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-06-2008, 07:49 PM
zuzu's petals's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Coastal N. Carolina ~ Zone 8-ish
Posts: 7,109
iTrader: (44)
Thanks G'mom, I hope it works well for you.
I'll bet that once you get started propagating cuttings, you won't be able to stop.
__________________
~*~ Zuzu ~*~


Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-06-2008, 08:13 PM
dkline's Avatar
Flower Garden
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: zone 5, Michigan
Posts: 3,654
iTrader: (25)
Another project for my list. LOL Boy, is that list getting long...... I did make tippy pots today, got that off my list.
Deb
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-07-2008, 04:30 AM
Mandy's Avatar
Flower Garden
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Schnecksville,PA
Posts: 3,546
iTrader: (43)
Send a message via Skype™ to Mandy
Thanks zuzu, I'll let you know how successful I am with this method!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-07-2008, 05:08 AM
Pushin-up-Daisies's Avatar
Tree
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On earth
Posts: 1,934
iTrader: (18)
Thanks zuzu never tryed that way before, saves on rooting space also. great info & pics. on demonstrating the method. u rock[Automated by GetSmile]
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-07-2008, 04:28 PM
NurseDebbie's Avatar
Sprout
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: zone 7 Chesapeake VA
Posts: 80
iTrader: (1)
do you know if this would work with Forsythia plants?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-07-2008, 04:40 PM
zuzu's petals's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Coastal N. Carolina ~ Zone 8-ish
Posts: 7,109
iTrader: (44)
Originally Posted by NurseDebbie View Post:
do you know if this would work with Forsythia plants?
I'd sure give it a try.
I think that semi-hardwood cuttings would be my choice.

I also know that Forsythia roots pretty well if you scrape the bottom side of a stem gently
(without cutting it from the mother plant) and pin it to the ground with something like a rock or a brick.
I've done that with several types of shrubs that grow long flexible stems,
and had pretty good luck.

I usually leave the stem pinned like that for a few months before cutting it free.
They tend to grow enough good roots that you actually have to dig them up,
and you have a really sturdy, good-sized plant all ready to replant.

I once forgot that I had done this with an Azalea,
and left it that way from one spring all the way 'til the next ...
by the time I dug it up, it was almost as big as the parent plant.
__________________
~*~ Zuzu ~*~


Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-26-2008, 12:03 PM
dkline's Avatar
Flower Garden
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: zone 5, Michigan
Posts: 3,654
iTrader: (25)
Ok I told you I was gonna try it and I did. I can never root anything......
until now!!!!!!!! I put about 6 little starts in my forsythe pot around 2 weeks ago. I have rooted a rose cutting and a variegated weigela cutting. Added a few more cuttings in there to try and root them also. The ones that havent rooted yet that were put in the pot in the beginning still look good so I'm leaving them a little longer hoping they will still root. Let me remind you that this is in spite of my little coon buddy knocking the thing over at least twice. So, now some of the cuttings in there have lost their tags so I"m not sure what some of them are. I have one question...does anyone know how to propagate an eunoymous (sp) ??? I have one in this pot and it still looks good but I am very impatient about getting one of these going. LOL Thanks
Deb
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-12-2008, 09:04 AM
trumpetvine's Avatar
Flowering Shrub
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: About 90 west of Ft Worth TX. zone 7/8
Posts: 643
iTrader: (26)

plant rooting


Zuzu, Thanks for the great information! I have some huge coleus that I would love to over winter. My greatest problem for the winter months though is lack of light! I can't wait to try this rooting method!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-12-2008, 09:12 AM
Pushin-up-Daisies's Avatar
Tree
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On earth
Posts: 1,934
iTrader: (18)
This the absolute best rooting method ,I rooted cat whisker,3 oleanders,&confederated rose within 2 weeks time. love it zuzu not going back to the old dirt jobby again.[Automated by GetSmile]
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-12-2008, 10:03 AM
GARDEN GUY's Avatar
Bush
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia Zone 5b
Posts: 1,267
iTrader: (15)
Great info.......lots of new plants on the way....
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-13-2008, 06:44 PM
bali's Avatar
Forest
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: 5
Posts: 16,003
iTrader: (54)

Smile


Then the sole purpose of the pot in the center, is for watering?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-14-2008, 05:31 AM
zuzu's petals's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Coastal N. Carolina ~ Zone 8-ish
Posts: 7,109
iTrader: (44)
Originally Posted by bali View Post:
Then the sole purpose of the pot in the center, is for watering?
If you are asking about the Forsythe pot,
then yes, that's right, you just keep the little pot in the center filled with water ...
(this is why the little one must be terracotta and it must have the bottom drainhole sealed off).
The water (from inside the center pot) wil seep very slowly
right through the walls of the terracotta pot, keeping the vermiculite evenly moist at all times ...
this is also the reason why the size of the two pots, relative to each other, is crucial, for this to work properly.

I also check to be sure that there is always some water down in the saucer.

The benefit for the cuttings is that they are constantly kept at a very even level of moisture.
I'm certain that some of my cutting propagations used to fail because
my watering schedule created difficulty for tiny and tender developing root fibers.
Back then, my pots of medium would become just a little too dry before I watered,
and then, perhaps, just a bit too wet immediately after I watered them.

The Forsythe system provides a stable moisture environment.

Keeping the pot in a location where you can control the stability of other factors
(such as temperature and light levels) is also going to help with success.
__________________
~*~ Zuzu ~*~



Last edited by zuzu's petals; 09-14-2008 at 05:33 AM.. Reason: typo
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-14-2008, 01:46 PM
zuzu's petals's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Coastal N. Carolina ~ Zone 8-ish
Posts: 7,109
iTrader: (44)
Originally Posted by missg View Post:
When would be the best time of the year to try this method with Azalea?
As far as I know, Ground Layering like this can be done at any time of the year, Gale.

If I were to do this in the fall in an area that gets colder winter weather than I do down here in zone 8,
I think that I'd actually dig a little trench, maybe a couple of inches deep,
and lay the branch that I was trying to root down in the trench,
then cover it back up with soil, just to give it a bit more protection.
__________________
~*~ Zuzu ~*~


Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cuttings, forsythe pots, propagation, rooting
-->

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


LinkBacks (?)
LinkBack to this Thread: http://www.plantswap.net/forum/f25/propagating-cuttings-using-forsythe-pots-1264/
Posted By For Type Date
Australian Gardening: Frangipani Heaven This thread Refback 02-27-2009 06:00 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin - Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2005-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved.