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Old 09-01-2008, 08:52 PM
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Moon flower question


My husband's aunt and uncle have a huge moonflower plant that is just gorgeous. I am looking to get some seeds from it. My question is - are the prickly round balls on the plant the seed pods and do I have to wait for them to turn brown? When we were there on 4th of July there were some pods. We were at the house yesterday and the pods are still green. Anybody have any info? Thanks
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Old 09-01-2008, 08:57 PM
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Moon flower ....


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Don't know if this helps, but the seed pods on my moon flower vine turned brown and dry before I plucked them off and the seeds seem to be just right. They seem to get quite dried out before splitting open - so far I haven't seen any split open, but the seeds are well developed, and rattle when the pod is shaken which is what I was told to look for.
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Moonflower seeds pods are easy to identify. As the flowers fade you will see large purplish-colored pods. Some gardeners like the looks of them and leave them attached to the vines, while other cut them off. To save moonflower seeds, collect the pods once they turn brown and start to crack open. If you're worried about frost before the pods dry out completely, remove them and finish drying them inside. Inside the pods will be hard, cream-colored seeds. These seeds sometimes take a while to dry, so you may want to store them over winter in paper bags to ensure they get some air circulation. In the spring, nick the seeds slightly and soak them overnight in warm water. This will help speed up the germination process before you plant them. Start the seeds indoors for transplanting or sow them directly into the ground once danger of frost is well past.

Last edited by unicorn2564; 09-01-2008 at 08:59 PM..
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Old 09-01-2008, 08:59 PM
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Thank you!! I guess I need to be a little more patient!
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:03 PM
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your quite welcome
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:25 PM
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Please excuse me for sticking my oar in ...
and I'm just taking a guess here, but I think that you all may be talking about two different plants,
both of which do go by the common name "Moonflower".

Based on G'mom's description of "prickly round balls"
I think that she is speaking of Datura.
(Pictures of Datura seed pods HERE)

While unicorn2564 describes "large purplish-colored pods" - which, to me,
sounds more like Ipomoea alba ("Moonflower Vine").
(Pictures of Ipomoea alba seed pods HERE)

But the answer that unicorn posted is excellent in either case
... best to wait for the drying-off process to begin on the plant.

The biggest difference would be what you would expect the seeds inside the pod to look like once they are dry.
Datura seeds will be smaller and quite numerous in each pod,
rather than large "hard, cream-colored seeds".

And Datura seeds will not need to be nicked or soaked before sowing.
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:32 PM
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Those dumbies...2 flowers with the same name ohh well what can you do. Thank God for Zuzu
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:37 PM
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Wack-a-doodle, huh?
I know that I drive some folks crazy by using botanical names
but it's only cuz I get so confused by the common names.
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:42 PM
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At least you know there names...lol
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Old 09-02-2008, 06:54 AM
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Definitely datura! I only now most plants by their "common" names and I do know that there are sometimes several differant plants with the same common name. Thank you all for the info! This is the learning part of this site and I love it.
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Old 09-27-2008, 06:28 PM
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Anyone in the PA area grow Daturas? I will be getting the seeds soon and want to know if I plant them now (fall) or do I wait until the spring?
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Old 09-27-2008, 06:44 PM
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Take a peek here

http://www.gardenersnet.com/flower/moonflower.htm
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Old 09-27-2008, 06:50 PM
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Thank you! I'm just so confused. Uncle has a plant by his driveway that has been there for years even though they are supposed to be annuals in this area. How does this happen? Does his plant self seed, the pods break open and seed?
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Old 09-27-2008, 07:48 PM
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I would imagine that is what is happening there. I have seen people say different zones for plants. Maybe there wrong with the zone.
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Old 09-27-2008, 08:49 PM
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Datura


Hey guys
Great discussion, people!

Here, in Zone 5b, Datura actually does re-seed - so that "big ol' Datura" would be in fact the offspring of the original planted plant. But in the spring, be patient. The seeds do not start coming up until about late spring, at least this far North.
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Old 09-27-2008, 10:40 PM
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Some Daturas are more easily grown as an annual than others. So there might be a difference in the species. I think D. Stramonium is a heartier species than D. Meteloides. It is good to research the habit of the different daturas and where they occur naturally.
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