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Old 09-15-2012, 02:57 PM
Acorn
 
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Native plants and gardening for wildlife.


I'm interested in networking with other south Louisiana gardeners who garden for wildlife or who garden with native plants.

Are you Cajun, too? I have some Cajun pass-alongs you might be interested in (Mamoo Plant, Red Buckeye, Louisiana Maypop).

I have a variety of plants I've collected over time (some antique roses, bromeliads, succulents, night-blooming cereus, tillandsias, succulents, gingers), and I also started gardening for wildlife in south Louisiana in 2000. I want to add more native plants.

I garden for wildlife in south Louisiana, but in particular I garden for butterflies/moths, hummingbirds, and bees. I have a garden area specifically for butterflies/moths, bees and hummingbirds. I raise butterflies for re-release into the garden...searching for eggs outside and raising them to adults.

There are a variety of critters that visit. We like to sit and nature watch in the evenings and early mornings. Butterflies and hummingbirds play in the garden all day. There are hawks, egrets, a little bluebird trail we maintain, purple martins, and so many other birds and critters that we enjoy watching every day. This time of year, we get a mob of hummingbirds that come to our porch feeders. They even came during Hurricane Isaac. Soon, there will be Canadian Geese on the pond. They leave in the early summer once they finish raising their babies. A wide variety of birds come by. We made a life list that quickly grew to over 100 types. From what we can tell, there are three types of turtles on the pond. At night, moths, raccoons, opossums and owls come out...and cute toads, geckos and frogs. Gotta love the barking tree frogs and bullfrogs at night. In the early morning, we see rabbits, sometimes we see a fox...and yes, sometimes a coyote.

I always have room to expand the garden, so I'm hoping to fill our property with more things for the critters. I'm always willing to swap plants, cuttings and seeds just so there is more habitat across the state for our native critters.

Let's see if I can find other people who are interested in gardening for wildlife, too. Holler if you are out there!
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  #2  
Old 09-16-2012, 01:33 AM
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I don't live in LA but I'm in TN. I plant to attack wild life myself. every day there is a new surprise. We are going to be working on a register butterfly garden next year, so I'm looking for host plants. this year for the first time we had migrating monarch stopped in for about 5 days. what a thrill

click on picture below to see slide show


zinnia are a must for butterflies, any way I would be happy to swap any nectar or host plant seeds with you. or ideas or stories. we will be putting in a mud puddle for next I was think or using a clay pot bottom any other idea are welcome. here is the movie I made on the humming birds this year
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=QgqCIfkjUYA
and a link to the different butterflies I have in my yard
butterfly everywhere today
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Old 09-16-2012, 02:37 AM
Acorn
 
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Thanks for the response. :-) Your photos are beautiful!

I'd be happy to swap seed for butterfly plants with you. Pm me and let me know what you have, and which butterflies you're missing host plants for that you'd really like to attract.

I'm not sure that all of them would grow where you are in TN, but I'll look at the seeds I have packaged. We can see what you think would work in your area.

Do you think False Nettle would grow there? It's a great native host plant that not many people think to include in the butterfly garden. It grows about 3-1/2 feet high, and it makes so many seeds. It comes up from the ground here each year, but I suspect it would just reseed itself in your part of the country.

I have Mountain Mint, but you may have that already? I actually got it from seed I collected in east Tennessee. The butterflies and native bees LOVE the flowers. It's a great nectar plant.

Hmmm, I'll have to sit and look through my packets and think about what would grow in a butterfly garden in Tennessee.

I have tons of seed I could share for Liatris, but you have Blazing Star already. They love all the fuzzy flowers. Purple mistflower is another fuzzy lavendar favorite of theirs as a nectar source. The native mistflowers bloom down here in fall, and the Buckeyes are all over it.

Wants of mine? Butterfly host plants and nectar plants. Anything the hummingbirds love, too.
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Old 09-16-2012, 02:47 AM
Acorn
 
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Oh, you asked about the mud puddle. I tried adding one for the first time this spring-- one like you described using a clay saucer. It is just a clay pot saucer filled to the brim with sand, gravel, and mud. I add rotting banana or a slice of melon every so often, and even a sploosh of beer or watermelon Gatorade.

It just gets too wet in our heavy rains, and with it holding too much water, it splashes out all over in any rain. I want it to stay moist, not soupy wet.

I'm going to take it out now. I'm going to put a piece of shade cloth down over a shallow hole in the ground and fill that with the sandy mixture. The excess water should just drain into the ground, and it should stay moist from either rain or when I water out there. I'm thinking of adding some of those gel granules that hold water, too. That way if it gets really hot and it isn't a watering day, it will hold moisture, even baking in the tropical sun. I hope.

I'll let you know how it works out.
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  #5  
Old 09-17-2012, 06:02 AM
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false nettle would work here

some 0f the plant that I looking for host plants that will grow here are
Pipevines (Aristolochia species), including Aristolochia californica, A. serpentaria and others. Leaves of plants in the parsley family (Apiaceae) including Queen Anne's Lace, Common Rue (Ruta graveolens). Many plants in the pea family including yellow sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis), alfalfa (Medicago sativa); various species of vetch (Vicia), clover (Trifolium), wild pea (Lathyrus), and bush clover (Lespedeza); and others. New Jersey Tea, hackberry, Milkweeds including common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), swamp milkweed (A. incarnata), and showy milkweed (A. speciosa); and milkweed vine in the tropics., plantain-leaved pussy toes (Antennaria plantaginifolia), wormwood (Artemisia and burdock (Arctium). Goatweed (Croton capitatum), Texas croton (C. texensis), and prairie tea (C. monanthogynus); all in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae) or any thing that works for you I'll try them to



what I have to offer
Iron weed.

black eyed Susy

wild asters

golden rode

passion flower

prim rose

milk thisle


and my zinnia that bring in butterflies, bees, humming birds. and yellow finches.


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Last edited by nyrak33333; 09-17-2012 at 06:28 AM..
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  #6  
Old 10-13-2012, 10:23 AM
Acorn
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
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Wildlife


Wow! Your garden sounds amazing! I don't live in the country but wish I did. In my city garden I am just getting started, but have seen a few more butterflies and hummingbirds this year. I have lots of squirrels, and rabbits but not much else. The description of your garden makes me jealous!!!
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  #7  
Old 10-13-2012, 01:56 PM
Acorn
 
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It's busy with critters, but it's pretty rough-looking since Hurricane Isaac passed through. I still have a LOT of cleaning up to do.
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Old 06-28-2013, 08:23 PM
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LightbulbBusy trying to outsmart squirrels this month


I did some research they eat 1.5 times their weight in a week. They can jump 6 ft vertically, 12 ft horizontally. Blue jays like watermelon & will eat a few seeds.
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