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Old 05-07-2007, 12:01 PM
Acorn
 
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Location: Statesboro, Ga Zone 8
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Hello Everyone,

I am new to this site. I live in Statesboro Georgia. I am just starting out with outside plants. I am so excited about fixing up my yard. A girlfriend gave me canna lilys and 4 o'clocks. I have bought 1 eucalyptus silver dollar, 2 joseph's coat, 2 columbine, 2 dwarf katie ruellia, 40 gladiolus, 3 spider plants (i think), 1 peace plant, 1 bride's veil, 3 ponytail plants 2 holly bushes, 1 jade plant. But as you can see most of my stuff is in hanging baskets except canna lily's 4 o'clocks, holly bushes, eucalyptus, gladiolus. I can do hanging basket however I am not sure of myself when it comes to yard plants. I am going to do my best. If anyone has any idea's, suggestions or help please let me know.
Thank you
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Old 05-07-2007, 12:19 PM
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Hi Loboga, Welcome to our forum. Regardless of where you garden, the most important thing is ground and bed preparation. Taking the time to cultivate your outdoor growing area well will produce rewards for years to come rather than maintenance problems. Areas to be planted should be cultivated to produce a good well draining soil texture, and after planting, a covering of mulch to retain soil moisture and help keep weeds out. If the soil is too hard or contains a lot of clay structure, adding organic materials and sand will help break it up. If drainage is poor, plant in raised beds. Not knowing your specific growing conditions, all I can do is provide the most broad and general advice and that is "The up front investment in terms of time, and labor to prepare a garden area well will pay great dividends for a long time". Good luck with your gardening pursuits. I would use the internet as a resource for further information. Knowing your approximate soil pH and what your plants desire for optimal growth helps a lot. My website "Southeast Texas Gardening" at http://www.southeasttexasgardening.info might provide some helpful information for you. Again, Welcome to PlantSwap.net Forum

Bob, Austin, TX
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Old 05-08-2007, 08:51 AM
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Hi Laboga, welcome to the forum.

You can always just drive around your area and see what the neighbors have planted to get an idea of what works in your area (or what you might enjoy seeing in your own yard).
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Old 05-12-2007, 02:02 AM
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Welcome. You live in a great state for gardening. I watch a show in the mornings called a gardeners diary and they show beautiful gardens all over Georgia.
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Old 05-15-2007, 11:42 PM
Acorn
 
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I would like to thank everyone that responded to my message. Your suggestion was helpful. I live in zone 8b. I have sandy soil. But so far I am doing pretty good with canna lily's, 4 c'clocks, tiger lily's, tulips. But I transplanted some pampas grass, not looking so good. I am watering every afternoon. I am waiting to see if the pampas grass is in shock from the transplant. I keep hoping it will take.
Thanks everyone.
K
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Old 05-17-2007, 07:07 AM
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My parent had pampas grass in their yards all through my childhood. I had to mow / weedeat around it every week every Spring, Summer and Fall. I loathe the pampas grass. It is
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Old 05-17-2007, 09:38 AM
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I have to agree with that about Pampas Grass! After removing a huge clump of it (took all day), getting cut by the sharp edges, etc, I was about to resort to a stick of dynamite to get it out of the ground. Best advice, don't plant it to begin with.
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Old 05-13-2008, 08:00 AM
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Hi Lobogo and welcome to the forum. You've been given some pretty good advice about preparing your gardens and you've selected some pretty good plants, so I expect you'll be a pretty good gardener. The MAIN thing you need is desire; then you'll be searching out answers to your questions. And do expect some failure - ALL us gardeners have it at times! Just learn from your mistakes and you'll be fine.

I live in SW GA. We're through Statesboro about once a month going up to Augusta. In fact, one of our sons is working in Statesboro now!

Personally, I think the pampas grass is a superb plant. I've grown it for over 30 years and still love it! Yes, the leaves are sharp and it's unsightly when the fronds begin to break down . . .but doesn't EVERY plant have it's drawbacks? When it's time to cut mine back, I just put on some heavy clothing and heavy gloves. The fronds won't cut you if you protect your body! I use the hedge shears and start at the top and work my way to the bottom - tossing the fronds out of the way as I cut. And the fronds dry wonderfully! I use them to decorate arrangements - and after they dry, they take and hold paint easily - I have some fronds in my house that I KNOW have been here for at least five years. I have them in a large vase just sitting in the corner of the den.

Happy gardening and you'll find wonderful help here! Hope to see you around more!
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Old 05-13-2008, 09:27 AM
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Welcome


Welcome Lobogo! I am new to this site too, & I love it! I think you will really enjoy it. I'll bet everyone who has ever had Pampas Grass has a story. I had it for 30 years in my yard & had a love/hate affair with it. Ours had finally gotten sooo large that it was obstructing the view. We decided to take it out & have replanted Zebra Grass which is not quite as invasive, but it still gives the same feel but with beautiful varigated blades. Trumpetvine http://www.plantswap.net/forum/image...shakehands.gif
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Old 05-13-2008, 09:28 AM
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Hey Loboga,

Glad to have you here. Jump right on in and enjoy your stay!
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Old 05-13-2008, 10:53 AM
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Welcome to the forum! Sounds like you have a great start. Gardening is one hobby that always has something new to learn and see. Even when you think you've seen it all, you see a new specimen that is magnificent or a new hybrid plant you can learn to grow. Some plants change color with soil changes and some grow differently in different climates and zones. I find gardening to be a most interesting hobby for people who like to learn and aren't afraid to jump right in and get dirty. Anyone can do it or at least appreciate it. The sights, the smells-from prickly succulents to glorious tropicals-there's something for everyone! Glad to have you join us. There's alot of good people here.
-Donna
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Old 05-13-2008, 11:18 AM
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pompass grass


I am watering every afternoon.
That may be the problem. Watering when the sun is high can burn plants. Try watering in the morning before 10 or in the evening around 6. I amnot sure if thats the pronlem but oits worth the try. Also again with the watering I have sandy soil too so again watering in the evenings works best. Gives the water a chance to sit and soak up over night. It evaporates quicker during the day.
Hope that helps!!
Jessie
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Old 05-13-2008, 11:45 AM
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Howdy Loboga jump right in and go at it good to have ya,Look our lists over.
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