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  #1  
Old 06-04-2011, 02:39 PM
Blade of Grass
 
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nepenthes (pitcher plant)


I picked up nepenthes yesterday but there is no water in the pitchers. Should I fill them with water?
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  #2  
Old 06-04-2011, 03:09 PM
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Not really necessary but you can as long as it's purified and does not have fluoride or chlorine in it. Distilled water or rain water is best though if you live in northern California I'd opt for distilled water since rainwater in the Pacific Northwest is still showing higher than normal levels of cesium radiation from the still melting down Japanese nuclear plants.
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Last edited by Xeolyte; 06-04-2011 at 03:48 PM..
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Old 06-05-2011, 07:14 PM
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And do you think that distilling the water gets rid of the radiation? or are you hoping that the distilled water is old distilled water?
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Old 06-05-2011, 07:22 PM
Tree
 
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Actually, I believe the plant will fill its pitchers with its own digestive juices - that stuff isn't water to begin with - from what I understand.
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Old 06-05-2011, 08:33 PM
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Would love to see pictures.
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  #6  
Old 06-05-2011, 09:14 PM
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Marasri I'm talking about the kind you can buy in jugs at the store and doesn't have chlorine and fluoride additives like a lot of city tap water. And why do you ask if I think that water distillation would get rid of radiation? Try rereading what I wrote .. I think you misread it or something.
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Old 06-05-2011, 09:56 PM
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My black humor is sometimes hard to understand and I should refrain from it online. My concept of radiation in our water is that I suspect that if it is in our rain water, it most likely given the lapse in time and the continuing radiation problem, that it is in our ground water, surface water in the dams that feed many citys' systems and therefore, the distilled water probably is hot too. I am one of those who does not trust the government to tell us the truth.
I live on rainwater in Central Texas and the aquifer that I am on top of, the Hickory aquifer has naturally occurring radiation in it due to the radon in the very deep wells. Some of the towns around here are 11X the national safety level to the point that the garbage dumps won't take the old pipes. It is strange, I am listening to a story on the radio right this minute that a friend of mine has been quoted on. The state government of Texas has been covering up this fact for years, it now appears.

I was interested in the fact that you thought the rainwater was contaminated and the distilled water safe. so I made the jump to wondering, jokingly, if distilling made the water safe. Sometimes my mind is pretty weird with its connections.

I appologize for causing a distraction from the topic on hand.
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Old 06-06-2011, 09:29 AM
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The pitchers of Nepenthes would normally be filled with rain water in the wild. All of the reading I have done on the subject indicates that it is best to use rain water or distilled water to keep some water in them. If the pitchers are completely dry they have a much shorter life span.

Distillation would remove radioactive particles from water. It is the cesium, iodine, radon, etc. that are radioactive not the water itself. The act of distillation leaves pure water without contaminants. There is little chance of water actually contaminated with siginificant quantities of radioactive hydrogen or oxygen.
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Old 06-06-2011, 09:45 AM
Tree
 
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How? With the "caps" ?
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Old 06-06-2011, 12:40 PM
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Thanks for the info Mini - I didn't know that distillation could actually clear out radiation! I knew that the nepenthese required pure water and that tap water would be hard on it. Ts .. if I remember correctly it's not digestive juices, but bacteria that causes organic breakdown of unlucky organisms that fall into the pitcher and its the bacterial waste that gets used for food.
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Old 06-06-2011, 12:45 PM
Tree
 
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I beg to differ. I have only heard of it being digestive juice. If you have heard about this bacteria, I'd love to see a reference. Here is a quote I found when googling : The pitcher is actually a swelling of the mid-vein in the leaf. Insects are attracted to this because of nectar secretions and coloration. The slippery rim (peristome) and inner walls of the pitcher encourage insects to fall into the digestive fluid at the bottom of the trap. Nutrients are absorbed from this "soup."
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Old 06-06-2011, 01:16 PM
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We can get into dueling quote here but we're both right:

This liquid, which is found inside the pitcher may either contain bacteria, that acts on the prey or insect larvae, that feed on the trapped insects. In the latter case, the pitcher plant absorbs the excreta of the larvae, which live harmoniously with the pitcher plant. In some other cases, the liquid contains digesting enzymes, secreted by the plant itself.

Pitcher Plant Info
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Old 06-06-2011, 01:23 PM
Tree
 
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NEAT! So it's both - cool.
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  #14  
Old 06-06-2011, 01:28 PM
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I remembered the bacteria thing because in my survivalist days there was discussion about whether or not the liquid in pitcher plants was ok to drink.
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  #15  
Old 06-06-2011, 01:30 PM
Tree
 
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I assume it's NOT ok to drink ?
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